Practice Areas


We can help you with the following fields.

Criminal Law

Criminal law is the body of law that relates to crime. It proscribes conduct perceived as threatening, harmful, or otherwise endangering to the propertyhealthsafety, and moral welfare of people inclusive of one’s self.Learn More »

Paternity law

Paternity law refers to body of law underlying legal relationship between a father and his biological or adopted children and deals with the rights and obligations of both the father and the child to each other as well as to others. A child’s paternity may be relevant in relation to issues of legitimacyinheritance and rights to a putative father‘s title or surname, as well as the biological father’s rights to child custody in the case of separation or divorce and obligations for child support.Learn More »

Immigration Law

Immigration law refers to the national statutesregulations, and legal precedents governing immigration into and deportation from a country. Strictly speaking, it is distinct from other matters such as naturalization and citizenship, although they are often conflated.Learn More »

Divorce Law

Divorce Law, also known as dissolution of marriage, is the process of terminating a marriage or marital union.[1] Divorce usually entails the canceling or reorganizing of the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage, thus dissolving the bonds of matrimony between a married couple under the rule of law of the particular country or state.Learn More »

Adoption law

An adoption is when an adult legally assumes the role of a parent for a child. Adoptions happen for numerous reasons, such as when the child’s birth parents are unable or unwilling to care for their child, when the birth parents are deceased, or when one birth parent remarries a spouse who wishes to assume legal parental rights.Learn More »

Child Custody and Support

If parents cannot come to an agreement regarding the custody and support of their child, one or both of the parents can file a lawsuit seeking court intervention. Generally, courts seek to maintain the parent-child relationship, and will not inhibit a parent’s ability to see his or her child without just cause.Learn More »

Probate and Estates

Probate is the judicial process whereby a will is “proved” in a court of law and accepted as a valid public document that is the true last testament of the deceased, or whereby the estate is settled according to the laws of intestacy in the state of residence [or real property] of the deceased at time of death in the absence of a legal will.Learn More »

Juvenile Court

juvenile court (or young offender’s court) is a tribunal having special authority to pass judgements for crimes that are committed by children or adolescents who have not attained the age of majority. In most modern legal systems, children or teens who commit a crime are treated differently from legal adults that have committed the same offense.Learn More »

Wills and Trusts

trust is a three-party fiduciary relationship in which the first party, the trustor or settlor, transfers (“settles”) a property (often but not necessarily a sum of money) upon the second party (the trustee) for the benefit of the third party, the beneficiary.[1]testamentary trust is created by a will and arises after the death of the settlor.Learn More »

General Civil Litigation

Civil law is a branch of the law.[1] In common law legal systems such as England and Wales, the law of Pakistan and the law of the United States, the term refers to non-criminal law.[1][2] The law relating to civil wrongs and quasi-contracts is part of the civil law,[3] as is law of property (other than property-related crimes, such as theft or vandalism).[4] Civil law may, like criminal law, be divided into substantive law and procedural law.Learn More »

Enforcement and Modification of Court Orders

Law enforcement is any system by which some members of society act in an organized manner to enforce the law by discovering, deterringrehabilitating, or punishing people who violate the rules and norms governing that society.[1] Although the term encompasses entities such as courts and prisons, it is most frequently applied to those who directly engage in patrols or surveillance to dissuade and discover criminal activity, and those who investigate crimes and apprehend offenders,[2] a task typically carried out by the police or another law enforcement organization. Furthermore, although law enforcement may be most concerned with the prevention and punishment of crimes, organizations exist to discourage a wide variety of non-criminal violations of rules and norms, effected through the imposition of less severe consequences.Learn More »